Monsanto’s Cotton Rejected Again: Burkina Faso Brings Back Indigenous Varieties

By Christina Sarich

Monsanto has been trying to take over Africa’s cotton for decades with their patented, genetically modified (GM) seed. Not without irony, Burkina Faso is just one of the African countries that has been wary of any of Monsanto’s GM seed, adding to the credo, ‘better off dead, than GM fed,’ when it came to accepting U.S. food aid that was primarily genetically altered. Africa’s biggest cotton grower in Burkina Faso is now phasing out Monsanto’s GM cotton and returning to indigenous varieties by 2018, due to concerns of cross-contamination of local crops and the less-than-stellar performance of Monsanto’s Bt variety.

This move by a West African country is noteworthy because Africa has been the unnamed poster child for promoting genetically modified crops as a means to end hunger and stop poverty by biotech interests. Investors like Bill Gates have donated millions to try to help GM crops catch on throughout the continent, stating that genetically modified crops could ‘end world hunger by 2030.’

Strangely, not a single GM crop has proven to do such a thing — with failing yields, superweeds, cross-contamination of indigenous crop varieties, and a host of health problems associated with GM seed, which was created to help sell herbicides. Monsanto’s Roundup Ready crops were named as such because they could supposedly withstand being sprayed copiously with Roundup, which has now been deemed a probable carcinogen in numerous studies.

via Monsanto’s Cotton Rejected Again: Burkina Faso Brings Back Indigenous Varieties

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